Iowa Press Association Editors Gain Perspective From Visiting Canada in 1879

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When the Iowa Press Association met in Cedar Rapids on Tuesday, June 18, 1879, several editors presented talks to the membership. J.G. Shannon, of the Elkader Journal, captivated the audience with his talk titled “Professional Obligations;” Matt Parrott from the Waterloo Reporter shared his thoughts in a speech titled “Legal Advertising;” and  D.M. Baker of the Chariton Leader spoke about “Independence in Journalism.” As engaging as those topics were for the newspaper organization’s members, they were undoubtedly distracted by thoughts of their upcoming adventure which began the next day. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays. Cheryl Mullenbach is the author of non-fiction books for young people. Her work has been recognized by International Literacy Association, American Library Association, National Council for Social Studies, and FDR Presidential Library and Museum.

Iowans Respond to 1892 Russian Famine

“Burlington must not be less charitable and humane than other cities of the state…” Burlington Hawkeye

“The people of Iowa have been blessed with abundant harvest, and the appeal should be generously responded to.” Iowa City Citizen

“Davenport has raised enough Russian relief money to buy two cars of corn. Let us make a better record in Dubuque,” Dubuque Times

Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays. Cheryl Mullenbach is the author of non-fiction books for young people. Her work has been recognized by International Literacy Association, American Library Association, National Council for Social Studies, and FDR Presidential Library and Museum. Visit her website at: www.cherylmullenbachink.com

Across the state newspapers encouraged readers to contribute to famine relief efforts for Russia in 1892.

Called Oldest Living Pioneer in 1910, Iowa Native Trekked The Across Country

“I have experienced the first real trial of my life. After a few days of suffering our little Hannah died of lung fever so we are left with one baby,” Keturah Belknap wrote in her diary in November 1843 of the death of her first child. But it would not be the last time she would endure similar pain. Three of her five children would die before reaching adulthood. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays.