Early Twentieth Century Iowa Woman Goes from Cattle Buyer to Vaudeville Performer

How many Iowa women could claim they had made a living as a cattle buyer and vaudeville performer in the 1900s? At least one—Ollie Northlane. Northlane was described as petite with a head of golden hair, only a bit over five feet tall and around 100 pounds in weight. Her physique was a topic of conversation because she had a job that typically was performed by men. And while it required a sharp negotiator, the position usually was filled by men who weren’t averse to slogging around in a barnyard.

Early Twentieth Century Iowa Woman Explores Brazilian Jungle

“An eerie feeling came over me. Suddenly a piercing scream of a dying animal was heard. What it was we did not learn,” Elizabeth Steen, a Knoxville native, told a Des Moines Register Magazine writer in September 1927. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays. Cheryl Mullenbach is the author of non-fiction books for young people.

World War I: Iowa Woman Received Recognition For Service As Nurse

“I shudder to think what the economic condition of the country and of all other countries involved will be when this awful war is over.”

Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays. Cheryl Mullenbach is the author of non-fiction books for young people. Her work has been recognized by International Literacy Association, American Library Association, National Council for Social Studies, and FDR Presidential Library and Museum. Visit her website at: www.cherylmullenbachink.com

Alice Beatle wrote to friends and family in Iowa from her post in Budapest, Hungary, in December 1914. And while Beatle expressed alarm about economic effects of war, her immediate concern was for treatment of the wounded soldiers under her care.

Female Mayor Cleans Up Iowa City in 1922

“Woman Mayor Refuses to Sign Big Contract Before Investigating”

The headline in Albia’s Daily Times newspaper must have caught the attention of readers in 1922. A woman mayor? And one who was hesitant to spend thousands of dollars in taxpayers’ money? A curiosity, for sure. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays.

Best Breadmaker In Iowa Award, 1912, Goes To 11-Year-Old Girl

“Lois is such a little girl that she had to get on her knees on the stool in the cooking
laboratory in order to knead her bread,” an official from the college in Ames said. The
spokesperson was describing how Lois Edmonds, an 11-year- old girl from Page County, became the best breadmaker in Iowa in 1912. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays. Cheryl Mullenbach is the author of non-fiction books for young people. Her work has been recognized by International Literacy Association, American Library Association, National Council for Social Studies, and FDR Presidential Library and Museum.

In Spite Of Wipe-out In Iowa, Early Twentieth Century Journalist Proves Women Just As Gritty As Men

“The west certainly surpassed all my expectations, and Iowa is great,” Cy Woodman claimed after traveling from New York to Iowa on a Flanders 4 motorcycle in October 1912. Ethel “Cy” Woodman had ridden cross country to follow through on a dare. The
freelance journalist had been at the New York City Press Club one day when a fellow journalist dared her to ride a motorcycle from New York to San Francisco. The dare came after Woodman boasted that women were just as “gritty” as men. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays.