Early Twentieth Century Iowa Woman Blazes Trails Working for the Railroad

“My advice to women who wish to rise in the railway field would be to miss no opportunity to learn. Such opportunities must be more than welcomed, they must be sought,” Daisy Oden told Railway World magazine in 1915. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays. Cheryl Mullenbach is the author of non-fiction books for young people. Her work has been recognized by International Literacy Association, American Library Association, National Council for Social Studies, and FDR Presidential Library and Museum.

Typewriter Created by Iowan Receives Rave Reviews at 1893 Chicago World Fair

Some called it the fastest and best typewriting machine in the world. It was destined to revolutionize the business world. What was this marvelous invention that everyone was talking about in 1893? It was a duplex typewriter invented and patented by Iowan Adolphus S. Dennis, a former teacher at the Commercial College in Iowa City. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays.

World War II Victory Garden Mania Hits Iowa

“Own your own victory garden and four room house,” a Davenport realtor suggested to buyers in a local newspaper ad in spring 1942. All over the state businesses used the victory garden campaign to sell their products and services. Seed and gardening stores offered free seed packets and information pamphlets to customers to entice customers to plant victory gardens. Clothing stores advertised slacks for women to wear while tending their victory garden. A Charles City nursery advertised for “Victory Garden Salesmen” to help sell products to “make healthy American workers and fighters.”

Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays.

Early Twentieth Century Iowa Woman Goes from Cattle Buyer to Vaudeville Performer

How many Iowa women could claim they had made a living as a cattle buyer and vaudeville performer in the 1900s? At least one—Ollie Northlane. Northlane was described as petite with a head of golden hair, only a bit over five feet tall and around 100 pounds in weight. Her physique was a topic of conversation because she had a job that typically was performed by men. And while it required a sharp negotiator, the position usually was filled by men who weren’t averse to slogging around in a barnyard.

Early Twentieth Century Iowa Woman Explores Brazilian Jungle

“An eerie feeling came over me. Suddenly a piercing scream of a dying animal was heard. What it was we did not learn,” Elizabeth Steen, a Knoxville native, told a Des Moines Register Magazine writer in September 1927. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays. Cheryl Mullenbach is the author of non-fiction books for young people.

World War I: Iowa Woman Received Recognition For Service As Nurse

“I shudder to think what the economic condition of the country and of all other countries involved will be when this awful war is over.”

Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays. Cheryl Mullenbach is the author of non-fiction books for young people. Her work has been recognized by International Literacy Association, American Library Association, National Council for Social Studies, and FDR Presidential Library and Museum. Visit her website at: www.cherylmullenbachink.com

Alice Beatle wrote to friends and family in Iowa from her post in Budapest, Hungary, in December 1914. And while Beatle expressed alarm about economic effects of war, her immediate concern was for treatment of the wounded soldiers under her care.

Female Mayor Cleans Up Iowa City in 1922

“Woman Mayor Refuses to Sign Big Contract Before Investigating”

The headline in Albia’s Daily Times newspaper must have caught the attention of readers in 1922. A woman mayor? And one who was hesitant to spend thousands of dollars in taxpayers’ money? A curiosity, for sure. Iowa History, a weekly column, appears at IowaWatch on Saturdays.